Whoo Hoo !!!

Discussion in 'EDIBLES AND SUSTAINIBILITY' started by Moose, May 2, 2014.

  1. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Watering my Jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) yesterday, I made a huge discovery! I found two fruit!!!

    Been growing this fruit tree for many years, never had any DSCN2326.JPG DSCN2327.JPG fruit until yesterday. There is only two, but its finally fruiting! Playful
     

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    kwmarko likes this.
  2. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    This is a slow fruit tree. At 8 ft tall and 6 ft wide, I was very frustrated that it not fruiting. I've had many look at it, only to be told "it should of fruited by now" DSCN2331.JPG .
     

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  3. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Even located some flower buds ...

    Hopefully there will be more fruit to follow. I started giving it some K-mag starting last September, I think it may have helped. DSCN2329.JPG DSCN2330.JPG
     

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  4. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    Ron, i planted a pair in Key West several years ago for better cross pollination supposedly, trees that should have fruited by now. I still haven't since a single flower on either one. I know that these can take tons of water. Apparently they grow on river banks in South America in habitat, where they flood with regularity and the seeds are passed on by the flooding and fish. I'm thinking they like it on the very acidic side too to produce. Plant Creations used to have a good sized crop of these in 25 or 45 gal, everyone loaded with fruit and flower. Maybe someday...
     
  5. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    Ron, i planted a pair in Key West several years ago for better cross pollination supposedly, trees that should have fruited by now. I still haven't since a single flower on either one. I know that these can take tons of water. Apparently they grow on river banks in South America in habitat, where they flood with regularity and the seeds are passed on by the flooding and fish. I'm thinking they like it on the very acidic side too to produce. Plant Creations used to have a good sized crop of these in 25 or 45 gal, everyone loaded with fruit and flower. Maybe someday...
     
  6. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Tim - yes, I was aware they love acidic soil - which I cannot provide. I've seen several over the years in South Florida landscapes that have fruited profusely, Mike Harris (Waykoolplantz) being one of them. I'll put down oak leaves, then mulch over the leaves. Its the best I can do as far as soil amendments without spending mucho $$$. I suspect that once fruiting has occurred, it will continue to do so in the future.

    This was the last of my fruit trees that have never fruited.The Jakfruit finally got on board last year. Embarrassingly, the Key Lime too. The Key Lime had me so aggravated that I contemplated removing it if it gave me no fruit last season. I feel it knew it was doomed and gave me a whopping 5 limes last year. Enough to prevent me from breaking out the saw. This year it is loaded. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Kipjanet

    Kipjanet Active Member

    Messages:
    140
    Location:
    Zone 10 Miami Springs, Fl
    You have key limes this close to me? you might have a new species of two legged squirrel in your yard and this one is not from that large island to the south. promise to leave a recipe for key lime pie in the bare spot of your tree.
     
  8. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    The Jaboticaba is fruiting again and this time with more fruit ! I made a big mistake of giving these to my wife Pam. She did not even know that it was a fruit tree and they grew on the trunk. Now she monitors it, she loves these fruits. Hopefully it becomes more prolific and I can eventually get my fill.

    Jaboticaba 1.JPG Jaboticaba 2.JPG Jaboticaba 3.JPG Jaboticaba 4.JPG

    Tim, I heavily mulch this tree and have thrown oak leaves around it trying to lower the soil's pH. It surely does love water but seems OK with what falls from the sky. I do only minor supplemental irrigation if it is dry for several weeks. There are crotons near by that show when they could use a little hydration - so the mulch under the tree will get a splash too. The mulch certainly does seem to aid in keeping the moisture levels up in the root zone.
     
  9. kwmarko

    kwmarko Active Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    key west
    Adressing Tim, Ron, and plant enthusiusts..... have been reading a lot about soil amendments being
    coconut coir (available at home depot Loewes...) available in various forms...... But more importantly
    neem cake which is readily available to order.... lots to learn about this topic.... anti insecticidal, anti fungul....
    increases worm populations, worm casting, increases microbacterial development, and organisms which make nutrients more availaible. I have honestly forgotten more than I have remembered.... lol Check it out folks.... I'm finding it most interesting..... mark
     
  10. kwmarko

    kwmarko Active Member

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    key west
    PS Congratulations on your jaboticoba fruit .... truly... an accomplishment.....

    and the neem cake is seemingly cheep cheep cheep....... made from the ground fruits and seeds to git the more importantly desired neem oil....
     
  11. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Mark, I mulch heavily with municipal mulch. The price is right, just costs me gas and my time. Because the Jaboticaba prefers an acidic soil, having all that organic material does lower the pH level some. I also try and collect oak leaves and put the down under the tree before the application of the mulch. I've had a second harvest of fruit since my last post, netting another 40 fruit. Its holding more small green fruit again. All the organic material attracts the earthworms for sure plus all the other microbial activity. During the mango season, I put all my mango peelings and rotting fruit under the tree and around my AeAe banana. Both seem to appreciative of the amendments.
     
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