The World Famous Hayward Mango.

Discussion in 'EDIBLES AND SUSTAINIBILITY' started by Stan, May 10, 2014.

  1. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Uh,not exactly a tree (rolling eye's icon here). But here's one in my yard with some small fruit. They should be ready by August or maybe late July. Mangoes in the bay area are rare outdoors. All under 12' from what I have been able to determine. Still,if you have a 8 or 12' tree,that's all the Mangoes you can eat in a short time anyways,best case.
    Here,they do need to be covered when 32f rolls around. Some years,it wont go below 35f,others can dip to ~30f. But all you tropical people might be shocked they can grow and flush and look nice in 75f summers.
    This is a former Baileys Mango that had the graft die. Its now two years in ground. Not bad since it was a stick of no leaves or branches in early 2013. A 2012 winter freeze zapped it when it was weakened by baring fruit in summer. That was in a pot. Now,in ground and looking up!

    [​IMG]
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  2. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Definitely pushing the envelope there Stan - but it's looking pretty darn good. I'm curious - are there any avocados up there? I have a feeling that Mangoes may be more growable than avocados. What is your take?
     
  3. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Avocado's are in every yard..at least in my neighborhood. Like soucal,no shortage of them or Citrus. z10a with cool temps,I figure we are like the very high areas on Hawaiian hillsides. Where Blue Gums start and coffee ends. But,I do have a coffee plant also in ground ( so to speak)..pretty slow,but three years+ now. Time flies. I never thought when I bought it in a bargain bin I would be saying three years later tales of it.
     
  4. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Dean,in those high areas of Hawaii,I would think Howeas would feel like being back on Lord Howe Island..same for Ficus macrophylla. But,I've never seen a photo of a grove of Howeas in Hawaii's high areas. They should outdo California's best because of the rainfall...and never,ever, a freeze.
     
  5. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    I have grown so may Howeas that I burned out on them. :) But there are some nice ones up a ways from me. I have planted some Hedyscepes - about a year and a half ago. And I can already tell they are growing about 3 times as fast as the ones I grew in SoCal. I have never seen any of them yet in Hawaii - so maybe I will be a first. But they should feel right at home here.
     
  6. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Funny,but I did see website of photos of 150' California Redwoods...growing in Maui. At 6,000 feet. They were planted in the 1910's- 1920's. That's comparable to coastal California growth. Everything grows a little better in Hawaii. Everything.
     
  7. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    I think my neighbor up the hill - a botanical "nut" - has some as well. I think where he has them is around 3,000 ft.

    His place is called Kona Cloud Forest Sanctuary - here's a video.
     
  8. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    At 17.5 foot above sea level, the mango's are happy. Just loaded the freezer up. Haden is nearly done fruiting, the Keitt won;t be ready 'til August. :GardenLove
     
  9. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    I have four small fruit developing,and the "tree" is now taller then that wire fence. I've been feeding it heavy along with a bigger watering zone..twice+ the diameter of what I started with when I planted it as a stick with a few leaves,last year.
    As marginal as marginal can be. BUT, 30 years ago? Impossible.
     
  10. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Go ahead - keep rubbing it in. :Hungry
     
  11. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    I have in laws near Miami. He said the same thing..loads of Mangos.:D The Hayward Mango tree has 3 . Catching up.:rolleyes:
     
  12. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Keitt 1.JPG Keitt 2.JPG Keitt 3.JPG

    OK - you asked for it Dean. Here is my Keitt mango. A variety developed in Homestead, Florida for South Florida conditions.
     
  13. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Keitt 4.JPG
    A late season mango, harvest is coming up in August. Yes Dean, they are "big dog" mangos! :happy-dance:
     
  14. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    You never see blue Mangos in California markets. Right now the Autulfo seem to be going neck and neck with Hadens as most plentiful Mango sold. Autulfo might be a good choice for California growers. I know I planted two seeds a week or so ago. I have more of what I can plant already...cant stop!

    I think there was a post of blue Mangos in San Diego last year on the net. A poster had bought a home down there with the Mango a little ignored and he got it back to producing...and then stopped writing about. Any mango is a good mango.
     
  15. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    SCORE - Costco just got in a bunch of mangoes and I just ate one - and they are not the crappy ones I got before, but nice and tasty. So - tasty and a good price. :gangnamstyle:

    MangoManMoose - question - I seem to cut and eat them differently every season. That would indicate that I haven't yet perfected a method I am happy with. The skin is difficult to remove - or should I say that if I peel it I feel as if I lose a lot of fruit, so I suck/scrape on the skin. And the fruit is so difficult to remove from the seed, so I end up sucking/scaping on it as well.

    Do you have any techniques for easy eating When I'm done with one I have to wash both my hands and face. ShamefullyEmbarrased
     
  16. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    And why are BUYING Mangos?:D When you have acres to plant them? If I can get fruit in 2 years from a stick of a Mango 37 degrees north,you could grow a whole slew of condo mangos if you didn't want a big tree. Try 'Julie' or 'Manila'.
     
  17. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    They are very hard to grow here with the "wet" conditions. If you don't spray, the flowers get that anthracnose.
     
  18. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Dean - While they are still firm, a potato peeler works very fast while not taking a lot of meat.
     
  19. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Ah - just had my morning mango. I like 'em soft and sweet. So I just hang over the kitchen sink. Fortunately, I have three Chambeyronias right outside the window - so a nice red leaf was in view as I chowed down. Happy
     
  20. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Dean - there are cultivars that are resistant to anthracnose fungus. Anthracnose attacks the fruits as well. The Keitt fruit is resistant due its powdery waxy type covering expels water off the fruit. It also gives them a bluish hue. As this wears off, its protection wains. The mango bloom here in South Florida coincides with our dry season. If we have an unusually wetter "dry season" anthracnose does diminish fruit set.

    There are "condo mangos" as Stan stated that can be be pruned to keep them around 6 ft and easy to treat the fungus during flower set. The "Condo mango"s term are "smaller" trees that can be grown in containers on condo balconies. Of course they would have more vigor planted in the ground. My recommendation is for you to seek out anthracnose resistent cultivars and maintain them around 15 ft. At that height, you could easily treat the trees with a fungicide. Once as the blooming spikes begin popping out, then a follow up treatment as the flowers begin to open. This should help fruit set exponentially.

    When pruning a mango, it is a rule of thumb that no more than 33% should be removed. Branches pruned back will most likely not produce mangos on the new growth. :hoe&rake
     
  21. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the advice MangoMan
     
  22. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Well,the World Famous etc,etc, gave fruit. Three. And it took until September to ripen. I picked the three and being that you can see they aren't exactly making Moose or other Floridians jealous...I figured they had to be not so good.
    Turned out- they were sweet,small,with a little fiber..but I take that. I'm happy. At 37 degrees north and the cold Pacific 40 miles west..Mango growing is all fun. And that (rootstock) tree has grown like a rocket. By the time the growing season is over- I think it might be closer to 3' taller then in that pic. Its at2' taller now.
    I added a "Carrie" Mango also. I'm hooked on Mangoes.
    IMG_1065.JPG
     
  23. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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  24. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Compare the growth with the first pic!
     
  25. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    big difference, cranking along
     
  26. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    IMG_1840s.jpg Here it is right now. Very compact flower stalk. Does it remind anybody of a named Mango? We had a mild dec-jan-feb of 65h and about 48f for lows. I'm not taking photos looking down at it as much as Mango-to eyeball now.
     
  27. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice job Stan - and it looks like you are out of the woods for any nasty weather this year - congratulations.
     
  28. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Must admit I was a skeptic about your mango Stan, you've proved me wrong. I'm sure it's success has a lot to do with your horticultural skills.
     
  29. amazondk

    amazondk Well-Known Member

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    Nice job with the mango. Mangos do not produce much fruit here as well. That is outside of the city. It is too humid in most places to set fruit well. Although iin Paricatuba where I have my country place there are a lot of big old mango trees, mostly the small fruited ones called cocoquinho in Brazil. Do to the large size they end up dropping a lot of fruit on the ground. Many of them have trunks 3 to 4 feet in diameter and are over 100 feet tall. I have one tree that came from a seed that Kris from India sent me. It had one fruit last year that got picked before it´s time. This year it should do something.
     
  30. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure if there are high humidity Mangoes. Should be. I know Amazon,that I saw one on tv like you described growing in the Yucatan. Tall,deep green,and yellow mangoes that were little Christmas tree ornaments from the scale of things.
    Here's a yesterday photo of the "World etc,etc,"Singing
    IMG_2014s.jpg
    My wife said my brother in law was picking big Mangoes off his tree in South Florida. Well,of course I told her. He could grow Coconuts too. The bay area and frisco fog are one heck of a challenge.
     
  31. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Moose!
     
  32. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Mine is almost ready to throw out a bunch of its beautiful new maroon leaves. I will post it then and see if anyone can tell me why this is supposed to be different than the "regular" mango - the species that can grow in wet conditions. Perhaps the guy I bought it from was just a good salesman. :)
     
  33. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Good salesman. Most mango cultivars that are in active growth flush succulent purple/maroon leaves. They stiffen and green up rather quickly.
     
  34. amazondk

    amazondk Well-Known Member

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    The big trees in the village where I have my place on the other side of the river I believe are polyembrionic and are know as manga coquinho. The must be around 100 years old anyway.

    dk
     
  35. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    No Moose - I meant a mango that can produce in high rainfall areas. Is there one?
     
  36. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Dean - The Caribbean alliance mangos get a lot of rain, but are spelled since the winter season is usually dry. The cultivars from Asia may be more suited to your conditions. They are typically smaller fruit and have a more succulent less fibrous flesh. Not conducive for commercial production but great for home consumption. Need to select ones that are resistant to the anthracnose fungus while thrives in wet humid environments.
     
  37. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Don - have you sampled them ?
     
  38. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Say hello to my little friends ...

    A late cultivar, Keitt mangos, still growing - harvest time begins in August :SmileyPetals

    mango 1.JPG Mango 2.JPG

    I've seen it on some garden forums that this cultivar does well in Southern California
     
  39. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm going to have to find an emoticon for envy. :)
     
  40. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    Another year for the WFHM. The fruit production has gone from 3 last year to 9 this year. Size appears to be the same if a bit plumper and no creases or wrinkles. The larger older root system is paying off. IMG_2219.jpg IMG_2218.jpg
     

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