Super dwarf Mexicola Avocado.

Discussion in 'EDIBLES AND SUSTAINIBILITY' started by Stan, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    It was sold as Dwarf Mexicola- I thought that meant the tree! These fruits are delicious and all- including edible skin,but they are tiny. I didnt even know any sold type of Avocado could be so dwarf.
    Now,I have a small yard...and Dwarf Avocado,Mangoes (in our climate all are dwarf) and Dwarf Meyers Lemon all produce a small amount. Even the White Sapote 'Suebelle' is called a dwarf as the largest types of that tree can reach 50' or more.
    An Avocado with edible skin..wild.
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  2. That is soooo cute. I didn't know that avocadoes came so small. And this Mexicola is EXACTLY what I was looking for when I bought my avocado tree, two years ago. I couldn't find a Mexicola anywhere in Kona, so I ended up getting a, "Malama", avocado, from Sunset Nursery in Kailua-Kona. I meant for it to be as close to Mexicola as I could find. In Napa, California, I lived on a property that had a Mexicola tree, and the fruits were amazing. They are so unlike other avacados, because they are so nutty tasting, like a cross between avocado and pistachios. Very intense and delicious and unique.
     
  3. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    Thanks RS. Are their "California" type Avocado's that grow in the humid tropics? Or is Kona that part of Hawaii that is the dry island? I know I bought a huge Florida- Caribbean Avocado fruit last year Very watery. The seed when sprouted did make a nice looking potted plant too- very nice form unlike the California types. It did die when home repairs left it dry too long. Fast grower btw.
     
  4. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Avos are a little tricky in that most of the time when they are watery they have been picked early, before the oil has had a chance to "come out."

    The best avos are the ones that fall off naturally, then you know the full taste and potential. So don't give up on a variety until you know you have had one late in the season - most of the time, after the skin has gone from shiny to dull.

    But there are so many varieties out there, and volunteers too, so of course that advice isn't 100% accurate.
     
  5. Stan, I don't know enough about avocados to answer that question. Kona is indeed the MOSTLY dry part of the west side of the Big Island. It is dry at low altitude, and then starts getting cloudy and rainy at about 1,500 feet. However, I live south of Kona, in Ocean View, which is out of the Kona rainy area. Even though I live at 3,000 feet, the climate where I live averages 30 inches a year. But for the past year, the rain has been almost non-stop. The nursery I bought my avo tree from is in Kailua-Kona, near sea level. The nursery people said that avos would not survive in Ocean View. And indeed, my tree is the only one I know of for miles. There is no logical reason why an avo tree shouldn't grow there, yet there are these strange life and death zones all over this island. I've had my tree in a container for two years, and it has done NOTHING. I'm going to put it in the ground soon, and continue the saga. Here in the nurseries, it appears that all the varieties are specifically selected for tropical conditions. The avos on the trees here are sooooo good. Very rich and creamy. I wish mine would succeed.
     
  6. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Avos have some special needs. They depend on a network of fine feeding roots that cover the surface of the area under the tree. If left to nature, they will form a dense canopy to the ground with a thick layer of dropped leaf litter underneath. Over time this leaf litter forms a rich humus laden environment for these feeder roots. In addition, this enclosed canopy keeps the surface cooler and moist.

    If you find a tree like this, you can confirm what I say by pulling back the leaves and you will see this mat of extensive feeder roots. They do not like to be molested, like driving cars near the trunks. While they will survive, and even fruit, if growing in less than optimal conditions - to do their best they need the above conditions. And if given those they can fruit profusely, almost like a mango.

    One other thing, not usually an issue on the Big Island, is they are susceptible to a type of root fungus that has caused problems in California. I believe they have a root stock now that is resistant. But the take away is that they also do not tolerate soggy soil and need good drainage.
     
  7. Alrighty then. :) Well, after I harvest all my corn in one spot, the avo tree is going there. That spot has 40% volcanic dust, 40% redwood compost and 20% manure, in a hole that's 2 1/2 feet deep and wide. And if it doesn't like that spot, then that tree will have to find someone else to take care of it. :)
     

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