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Subtropical feels so much nicer then tropical...

Discussion in 'INTERESTING, INSIGHTFUL, PROVOCATIVE, EDUCATIONAL' started by Stan, Jun 10, 2014.

  1. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    At 75-80 for highs and 60 for lows? I 'm of the opinion I prefer that ALL year if possible over the true tropics and say 90f and 80f of say Southeast Asia. Or even a southeastern USA summer. We had over 90f...and today's temp of 77 with a breeze feels perfect. I'm just not suited to tropical temps,flip flops and sweating like I thought I might be in the cool of December!
    And some more bay area weather trivia..the Waters off of Half Moon Bay are a balmy 69f degrees. What was HMB's high yesterday? A foggy 59f!..ugh..too cool in the other direction. That's a prozac summer.
     
  2. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    That's why all the locals over here live "upcountry." At about 1200 ft. it never gets over 85, and is always around 70 at night. No need for owning long pants or sweaters, yet still comfortable at night when trying to sleep. No heaters and no air conditioners. It is as benign a year round climate as I have ever experienced.
     
  3. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    I sure like the looks of all those exotic plants that evolved in lowland tropics...but keeping smaller versions of them in more comfortable weather is well worth the tradeoff. And then,unfortunately the great majority wont even take that.
    But 80f and 60f...thats my idea of perfect bay area weather. 70?..lol..only if it hits 100f here!
     
  4. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    There are some really exotic looking plants that come from the cooler "cloud forest" locations in the tropics. But finding them is often an issue, and they rely heavily on humidity and don't like hot or cold - but will tolerate some "cool."
     
  5. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Stan - the temperature range you are describing is tropical :jiggy:
     
  6. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    Well,there is not a scientific term like "Ultra -tropical" Moose that we always bandy about on Exotic plant forums. I mean the large part of the rainy tropics that never go below 70f and can and do have 90-100f or more and humidity to match. I look at Manila..and every day of the year,90F and 80f for a low- lol. We just had 2-3 days of that,and 20% humidity and I was done fur. And..back to the southeast. Miami is neck and neck with southeast Asia all summer long. I have relatives in Miami,who grew up in the tropics. They actually miss their college days weather at UC Davis here in California.
    I envy I guess a sunny clime,at elevation in the tropics. The day length doesnt change,the sun feels warm in Jan or June. The Bay Area is ok 9 months of the year,sometimes that shrinks to 7 ,in a cool wet year- I hate those. When I hit the lotto..going for a 12. Somewhere!
     
  7. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    What I don't miss about the Mainland, and what you guys have even worse in the Bay Area is the length of the winter day. I can't even stand it here when it starts getting dark around 6:00. Dark at 4:30 in the afternoon is downright depressing for an outdoors person.
     
  8. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Stan - I visited Costa Rica several years back. My thinking about "tropical" became altered then. At higher elevations there, it was very cool, 50's F to high 40's F. The lushness was incredible. Yes, the heat and humidity here can be very oppressive. We just deal with it, doing most heavy gardening work in the morning. In the afternoons, I plan my activities in the shaded areas. The late afternoon to early evening showers bring much cooling relief.

    The temperature range you were referring to is what we experience between cold fronts during our winter. Unfortunately, enjoying the garden during the winter months is often limited to the Weekends. Like Dean alluded to, its dark when I go to work and the afternoon sun is short lived. Not much sun time to get any serious projects done. A shame because it is very comfortable then.
     
  9. Jerry@TreeZoo

    Jerry@TreeZoo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,628
    Tropical lowlands are nice to visit but I would not want to live there. It would be like a South Florida summer, all year long. No thanks. The same location with 500 or more feet of elevation makes a world of difference. I think above 2000 feet in most tropical locations might be a bit cool for ultra tropical plants, but there are lots of things that grow well there.

    Try:

    Sea level in Far North New Zealand
    Atherton Tablelands in Queensland, Australia
    Any elevated place in Costa Rica
    Northern Hamakua Coast on Hawaii (Big Island)
     
  10. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    The last two years in the bay area have been nice. Other then a week in December 2013 and January 2013,its been pretty mild..mildest ever. But if we average it to 70-72ff (historical high average for the year is a few tenths under 68f..that's still not 80f EVERY day..lol. Dream for the best.
     
  11. Alicehunter2000

    Alicehunter2000 Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    9a
    Thank goodness for fall and spring around here....pretty pleasant.
     
  12. Alicehunter2000

    Alicehunter2000 Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    9a
    Thank goodness for fall and spring around here....pretty pleasant.
     
  13. Pix

    Pix Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    263
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    I would probably be happier in Hawaii... but I am very happy here too. I do not mind the heat. I only miss fall. It is why I am growing crotons.
    We are planning to go to Hawaii next year (for 2 weeks). Where to??
     
  14. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    Wouldn't you know it ..we've had a run of 80f and 60f more or less all August. Shockingly with moderate humidity,up to 60% A monsoonal set up since July. In my near 6 decades of living in the bay area,I have never seen subtropical moisture stream that long over the bay area. In soucal,they have had once in 500 years thunderstorms.

    Hawaii is probably best for eternal spring,early summer. I read that two Typhoons are headed that way and will probably degrade to storms. Still,some islands have never had a Typhoon (again I read someplace years ago)..this could be a first?
     
  15. I live in Hawaii, but it's a lot hotter and less pleasant than I thought it would be, at least when I'm down at sea level. I live at 3,000 feet elevation in Ocean View, and it rarely gets above 80 degrees there. At this time of year, the nighttime low is 60 degrees. However, our record low temp is 46 degrees, in January, two years ago. We can't grow breadfruit where we live. And we can't grow coconuts either, but not that I'd want to.
     
  16. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,861
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Ah Ranger --- I just asked where you lived on another topic. Not too many places where you can live at 3,000 ft. on this island.
     
  17. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Mangoes :cool:
     
  18. We might be able to grow mangoes where we live, but I'm not sure. I had a mango seedling planted in the native soil, and it sulked and wouldn't grow for two years, and I finally pulled it out. But I have since learned that the native soil in Ocean View is worthless as something to grow decent plants in. It is pure, powdered rock, which allows ZERO water and air penetration, and little more than weeds will survive in it. I have since learned to amend the lava powder with redwood compost and manure, and I have much better results with the things I grow these days.
     

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  19. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    500
    And lava does contain a high amount of natural fertilizer- phosphorus for one. I can see where you could make a high grade soil fast with compost.
    That corn is GREEN!
     
    Ranger Smith likes this.

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