'Stoplight' extra hardy?

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by Stan, Nov 13, 2014.

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  1. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    507
    I got a tip this cultivar will hold leaves all winter in soutex. And later,i spotted what l think is 'stoplight' in photos of the Sherman Gardens greenhouse. Unheated,I believe.
     
  2. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Hi Stan, in my limited experience, I've had my stoplight for over two winters with temperatures down to low 30's. I don't remember it ever losing a leaf because of cold weather. It does have some larger bushes to its north, but no troubles here. Good luck! It is a beautiful croton.
     
  3. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    507
    Thanks Anna- is there a good ebay Croton seller or Florida? Somebody that is the "Michaels (broms)" of Crotons?
     
  4. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

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    1,650
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    Stan - I'm a regular ebay shopper for all sorts of weirdness but have not seen anyone good for crotons. (I also collect croton picture postcards and croton postage stamps.)
    For the cost of postage, a lot of members here would be glad to send you cuttings. You'd be on your own then, but there's probably a few threads and posts on rooting cuttings. It's not difficult at all - once the weather warms up or if you have a heated greenhouse. I know there's one croton head in the Houston area, but she has a greenhouse.
    Recall that the croton really is a tropical plant. Mine here in the warmer part of St. Pete get fried every ten years or so. I'll have to dig out some old pics - it ain't purty.
     
  5. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    Found them! Here's some pics of the yard after the crappy winter of 2010. You may pick out a few scraggly Stoplights. Fortunately, most recovered as evidenced by some recent pics in the Landscape section. The palm with a short fat trunk in one pic is a Beccariophoenix fenestralis which came through in good shape; the Bottle Palm in another was a casualty.
     

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  6. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    whoops, here's the long gone Bottle Palm
     

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  7. junglegal

    junglegal Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    3,135
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    Good reminder Phil. 4 short yrs ago. Stan, if I'm not mistaken, the AFD varieties were bred for cold hardiness although my experience was that they defoliate like all the rest.
     

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