Show me your tropical Lycopodiums and Huperzia..Staghorns!, Treeferns!

Discussion in 'COMPANION PLANTS - TROPICAL & SUBTROPICAL' started by Stan, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    507
    IF I lived in blessed Hawaii? I might pass on Broms and Tillys for attaching to my tree. It would be the super exotic primitive plants like titled. I once came on a board of them that is centered in southeast Asia,half of the writings were unreadable..but the plants? Long BLUE Huperzia Dalsomething's..and just fantastic plants that REQUIRE all year warm and humdity. And tree ferns...I have subtropical tree ferns,including the tallest Tree fern that can be grown in California,Cyathea medullaris...and one that is half that- C.brownii even if in habitat it's called the tallest tree fern species in the world. The Hawaiian Cibotium's can be grown here...at a very leasurely pace-lol. And never of course reaching the mass of tropical climate plants.
    As long as I'm asking..the Staghorns. Dean,you HAVE to have P.riddeyi!..'cmon spill the pics!

    A tropical fern forum would be great here. Steve Pope has a great collection in the UK under glass. Get him to post here and you have a world authority in tropical fern propagation. Oh well,think about it.
    I have to admit,I have a poor knowledge of Orchids. I wish I knew much more..some Catleya's actually do grow outdoors...precarious,but in long stretches and for years.
    Thanks all,
    Stan.
     
  2. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    507
    HA!..where did that kat icon come from?
     
  3. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    For everyone - you can see a bunch of nifty emoticons if you click on the smiley in the reply box editor bar and click the Extended Tab.

    I have a ton of native tree ferns, but not many Platys or others - but I'm going to take a short video when I have time to experiment with posting videos and show you.
     
  4. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    507
    Well,I see with only 51 members I might go first-ha. Soon,they will flock Dean.
    A Cyathea medullaris I just divided that had a sporeling fuse on to the main trunk for years now. Later my lone Huperzia,H.squarrosa and some subtropical ferns that I have going here outdoors 24/7 in the SF bay area.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Thanks for the cool photos Stan - I'm impressed with how tropical everything looks. Perfect time of year to attempt your "split."
     
  6. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    507
    Your welcome. Along with the fern dividing,I did some weeding out of Podocarpus gracilor seedlings...hundreds or a thousand..like a ground cover in my yard. I wonder if that tree is invasive in Hawaii? especially in the cooler mountains?
     
  7. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    13,862
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Haven't seen it anywhere but yards. Where I am, the three nastiest invasive trees are (don't know the Latin) Silver Oak, Brazilian Pepper, and Guava.
     
  8. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Stan - here is a Staghorn Fern, Platycerium bifurcatum. This is endemic to Australia and is the most widely grown species. It may also be the most cold hardy. In Florida we see them in hanging baskets under trees or growing right on the trunks. Platycerium bifurcatum 1.JPG Platycerium bifurcatum 2.JPG
     
  9. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

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    7,952
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Here is a close-up of the shield fronds. Platycerium bifurcatum 3.JPG
     
  10. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Stan,

    I haven't forgetten you - just been kinda busy - and these are not the fast and easy pics. But here's a P. superbum.
    Stag.jpg
     
  11. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    507
    Oh yeah, P.bifurcatum can even naturalize in Florida gardens. Even Los Angeles. I have one that's been around since 1978. Once it was killed back by cold- 1990,since then never had a problem other then cats wanting to sleep on it. I had to get up on ladder and cover the top with green wire. It's up in the Podocarpus tree I mentioned before.
    I also have P. superbum. So far so good the last two years. I'm sure others in the bay area have a few large ones. After that, it get touchy as many are much more tropical. Even the Andian seems more tender then the name suggests. P.riddeyi is the top of the Staghorn food chain as exotic and tender. Well, As far as I know.
     
  12. mwardlow

    mwardlow Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    Huntington Beach CA Zone 10a
    Here are a few of the Staghorn Superbum
    Staghorn Ferns 001.JPG Staghorn Ferns 004.JPG Staghorn Ferns 019.JPG Staghorn Ferns 014.JPG Staghorn Ferns 015.JPG Staghorn Ferns 017.JPG Staghorn Ferns 013.JPG Staghorn Ferns 018.JPG Staghorn Ferns 010.JPG
    and other ferns in my garden. A small Cibotium Glaucum a Cyathea Brownii a small Cyathea Cooperi Revolvulum and a large Cyathea Cooperi and offsets that I did not plant. It came from spore from the neighbors yard so I had to keep it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 7, 2014
  13. Stan

    Stan Well-Known Member

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    507
    Very nice Mward. What fern is in the third from last photo? It seems to have black bases at the stipes. The very lacy fern next to the Alcanteria (2nd form last photo) is the C.ooperi revolvulim? Never heard of that one.
    The third from the top Staghorn - is that P.vetchii? maybe 'lemonii' ? I have a very young one..still not stiff yet.

    My C.brownii was on the fast track....and went through a summer of neglect a few years ago. I almost quit the exotic plant interest. I came back...but its never recovered that big fern vigor. Just a friendly warning about letting tree ferns go too dry to all. Sometimes,just once will do it.
     
  14. mwardlow

    mwardlow Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    Huntington Beach CA Zone 10a
    Thanks Stan, third from the last is my Brownii, this one has a very black base. The Cooperi Revolvulum is the weeping form of the standard Cooperi a very fast grower has tripled in size since last year. I dont know the name of the other Staghorn fern I think is is just a common form that gets a lot of sun. I agree on the watering tree ferns dont like to go dry.
     
  15. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,862
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    I have found out the same thing the hard way with ferns in SoCal. When they go dry, the roots die - and since they are all just thin roots, that's that. It is not like a tree or palm in that the thicker roots stay alive and can bring the plant back again by re-growing.
     

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