Licuala sp. identification help

Discussion in 'PALM TREES - WHERE TROPICAL STARTS' started by James_Guam, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. James_Guam

    James_Guam Member

    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Agana Heights, GU
    Greetings all!

    I'm looking for some help identifying my Licuala palms. I purchased them from a local plant vendor, but they weren't sure of the exact species. I had purchased some seeds of L. peltata var sumawongii and L. orbicularis on the internet prior to finding these palms locally. They're already starting to sprout and I'm pretty excited! So I am basically hoping these are of L. grandis but if they're not, it's not a problem. Thank you in advance for your help!

    -James

    overall.jpg
    Overall shot

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    New leaf

    leaf.jpg
    Leaf up-close

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    Leaf bases
     
  2. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,862
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    I am pretty sure that is exactly what you have. Coming for a local dealer that is the most obvious, and I had a bunch at that age and they look identical. But Licualas are a difficult ID - and this is the first time I have ever offered a guess - only because I am fairly certain - but not positive.
     
  3. James_Guam

    James_Guam Member

    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Agana Heights, GU
    Thank you for the insight. Some of the local nurseries here on Guam use the scientific names on their plant labeling and are knowledgeable which helps me do more research online to plan out if I want the plant and what the requirements are, space-wise and care-wise for foreign species. I'm quite a bit more familiar with endemic species so it's always nice to have a knowledgeable nurseryman.

    Thanks again!

    -James
     
  4. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    James, They look like L. grandis to me also.
     
  5. Jeff in Costa Rica

    Jeff in Costa Rica Active Member

    Messages:
    201
    I've planted a ton of these in Costa Rica. I agree they are Licuala grandis.
     
  6. Palmarum

    Palmarum Moderator

    Messages:
    247
    Location:
    S. Florida - Zone 10a/b
    They are L. grandis, but I've noticed a few leaves are starting to divide (or were split by contact) instead of stayed entire. If they continue to divide they could be Licuala cabalionii, which is basically the split-leaf counterpart to L. grandis, and the closest relative to L. grandis as well. When both species are about that size, they are almost indistinguishable until the leaf changes. They are also native to the same island in Vanuatu, making seed collection of either species possible.

    Ryan
     
  7. James_Guam

    James_Guam Member

    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Agana Heights, GU
    Thanks Ryan,

    I do believe that the leaves split because of handling, however, I will continue to monitor and see if the leaves come out naturally split. After reading your post I headed out to the back to see if the newer leaves showed signs of splitting naturally. They all seemed to be caused by the back-to-back tropical storms we had in the last two weeks. Along the splits they were brown so I'm assuming that's because they were damaged from the wind storm.

    Thanks again!

    -James
     
  8. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,753
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    I agree with the others, they do appear to be L. grandis, BUT, keep an eye out like Ryan stated, there's a slim chance of them being L. cabalionii, if they split on their own.
     
  9. James_Guam

    James_Guam Member

    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    Agana Heights, GU
    Thank you for all the input ya'll. In other exciting Licuala news, two more of my L. peltata var. sumawongii seeds sprouted so I've potted them up. The orbicularis is taking it's time. I did remove the shell (unsure of the technical term), the thin woody coating between the husk and the actual seed on the peltatas which we do here for fan palm seeds and fruit tree seeds. That's probably why they have had faster germination. It was too delicate of a task to remove the shells from the orbicularis seeds so I let them alone. This is a fairly common technique here, but for betelnut and coconuts we just let them sprout on the ground. Have a good day everyone!

    -James
     
  10. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,862
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Be ready to have them try your patience. They are pretty slow as small plants. And even slow as juveniles. But well worth it when they get come size.
     

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