Its Been Years...

Discussion in 'COMPANION PLANTS - TROPICAL & SUBTROPICAL' started by ScotTi, Apr 24, 2015.

  1. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

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    On my trip back to VA I got to see the spring time I grew up with.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2015
  2. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    Maybe years for you - but never for me. Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

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    Here is the Dogwood tree. I have tried a Dogwood here a couple of times, but they fizz out the second year. pizap.com14300453237301.jpg pizap.com14300455074061.jpg pizap.com14300456353651.jpg
     
  4. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

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    It's a different world there, and so glad to be here in the sub-tropics though.
     
  5. VeroKarl

    VeroKarl Well-Known Member

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    Vero Beach
    I can remember tulips and the flowering dogwood as a kid as well. I also remember as an adult that the tulips needed to be replanted every year and my dogwood died from the anthracnose that wiped out many of those trees in New England. I will happily give up all of those spring blooms to grow tropicals here in Florida, but do still have a special place in my memory for the wild dogwoods, redbud trees, and the scent of lilacs.
     
  6. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    And don't forget Wisteria, when in bloom. How cold can those go?
     
  7. VeroKarl

    VeroKarl Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Vero Beach
    Yes the Wisteria were spectacular when in full bloom. While I did not have one in my garden up North, they were hardy in New England and a common sight in the landscape.
     

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