Hybridizing

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by Crotonologist, Dec 20, 2010.

Banner funded expressly in recognition and support of Tropiscape.

  1. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    I want to start creating my own croton hybrids next year, so I've been trying to get my hands on as many different crotons as I can to improve the odds of having plenty of flowers to work with...
    Anyone have any hints, tips, or tricks of the trade that they might want to share?
    I wonder if any of the old hybridizers kept records of their work, and if it is still available somewhere?
    I can't seem to find much on the internet...
     
  2. Croton Guru

    Croton Guru Banned

    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    SouthFlorida
    There isnt a whole lot if anything out there on Hybridizing Crotons, But your work will show in about 4yrs time. So make sure you do alot :) Document everything you do, should be interesting. Good Luck, Hope you make a ton of winners.
     
  3. Sergey

    Sergey Active Member

    Messages:
    282
    Location:
    Siberia, Russia
    Good luck in this creative and interesting work, Peyton!

    My recommendations are very simple but can be useful if you start with hybrids for the first time.

    1. To get interesting hybrids crotons with distinctive features should be cross-pollinated. It will also increase the chances to get something absolutely new as a result. Certainly you can predict what you can get as a result judging by leaves’ shape and colors of parenting plants. But there is always a chance to be surprised by “hidden” gene as the origin of many crotons is a mystery.

    2. I apply pollen with a tiny soft brush to the center of female flowers.

    3. Manage to get all ripen seeds. The more the better. More chances to get something new. In case of self-sowing… nature favors green seedlings as they are usually stronger than their colored siblings. To get all the seeds without any loss use light material to cover a bunch of maturing seeds (I use medical gauze bandage). So you don’t need to worry about seeds when they start catapulting for many meters.

    4. I set seeds to the depth not more than 0.5 – 1cm (depends upon their size). It’s optimal for them to start growing. Some of them start to grow too bright (yellow) from the beginning – these ones need to be shaded for successful growth. Sometimes I remove yellow tops and they begin to grow green.

    5. I’ve tested different potting mixes for seeds and come to the conclusion that they best do in the mixture of coconut coir and vermiculite. This mixture is sterile and I don’t have problems with rotten roots. Some young seedlings are rather vulnerable and you should keep good growing conditions (temperature and light).

    6. When young seedlings become stronger I plant them in more nourishing soil.

    7. Don’t hurry to get rid of hopelessly green plants. Many hybrids require very good light and start colored when get matured.

    8. Keep documenting which crotons you use for pollination. In 4 years there is a chance to forget the origin of new croton sensation:)!
     
  4. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    Hi Sergey,

    Thanks for the tips!
    I've seen some old posts here where you have made some nice crosses already yourself...
    I can forget stuff a lot faster than 4 years - more like 4 weeks or maybe even 4 days...
    So yes I plan to keep records.
    Maybe one day we can trade some plants long distance - maybe woody stem pieces would make the long trip OK...
    or maybe even seeds!
    :)
     
  5. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    Thanks Dave!
    I appreciate your thoughts :)
     
  6. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    BTW, does anyone know if croton pollen can be stored in the fridge or freezer for later use?
     
  7. Sergey

    Sergey Active Member

    Messages:
    282
    Location:
    Siberia, Russia
    Once I kept pollen in the fridge for about 3 days and failed to get seeds after that. I think it’s worth to try again to get positive results. Please, let me know if you succeed in this experiment.
     
  8. Sergey

    Sergey Active Member

    Messages:
    282
    Location:
    Siberia, Russia
    What about liquid nitrogen? :D
     
  9. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,952
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Nitrous oxide??? :eek:
     

Share This Page