Egg Shells ...

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by Moose, Feb 7, 2012.

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  1. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,952
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    I try and save most organic materials from my kitchen and put them around plants to compost. I also save egg shells as well. Being composed mostly calcium, which there is no lack of in my soil, is there any other minerals in the egg shells that would be worth adding to my soil? Am I just wasting my time? :confused:
     
  2. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    Egg shells are very slow to decompose. If your soil suffered a CA or Mg deficiency, there's quicker ways to improve it. However, you are not going to hurt anything with egg shells.
     
  3. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    From General Chemistry Online:
    "The main ingredient in eggshells is calcium carbonate (the same brittle white stuff that chalk, limestone, cave stalactites, sea shells, coral, and pearls are made of). The shell itself is about 95% CaCO3 (which is also the main ingredient in sea shells). The remaining 5% includes calcium phosphate and magnesium carbonate and soluble and insoluble proteins."
    http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/consumer/faq/eggshell-composition.shtml
     
  4. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,952
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Curious about bones? Chicken, beef, pork, lamb, etc ... do they provide any benefit to the soil? I've been burying them beneath the mulch. If they are 95% calcium as well, perhaps I shouldn't bother. :confused:
     
  5. Central Floridave

    Central Floridave Active Member

    Messages:
    483
    Although composting is really good idea, I don't do it because I don't want to attract raccoon and rats.

    You can buy bonemeal for a fertilizer so I'm sure your left over bones would work also. But, I'm worried about critters and you also have to be careful with bacteria. Handling table scraps and letting it rot in your yard has to bring some nasties. So, I guess composting in a closed bin rather than burying under mulch is a better idea. Plus, I have dogs, how long would a pork chop last under the mulch? LOL...
     

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