Do Crotons come true from seed?

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by LJG, Aug 26, 2014.

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  1. LJG

    LJG Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    I have a croton that is not a real popular one in FL but for here in SoCal I think it could be a real winner. I got it from Searle back in 2008 and have to cut it back each year it grows so fast. It also sets seed and germinates in my garden pretty profusely. I would like to start digging these and sharing with others that want a good SoCal croton. The Croton is Purity.

    Here is an example of what I am digging out of the ground. Seems like it will hold true from seed but I don't want to waste time.
     

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  2. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    No, they do not come true from seed. The only way to keep the true genetics is from vegetative propagation such as cuttings or air layers.
     
  3. palmisland

    palmisland Well-Known Member

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    1,258
    Location:
    West Boca Raton 10b
    Sorry Len, crotons seeds are a crapshoot. As Tim wrote, air layers or cuttings are the most reliable. Purity is one of the faster growing cultivars. I try not to discard any trimmings, but prefer to root them up & give them away. If Purity does well for you, there are probably quite a few more varieties to try.

    -Randy
     
  4. LJG

    LJG Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    Thanks Tim and Randy. Figured as much. It can never be easy :)

    I tried cuttings but even in my greenhouse it is too dry for them to take. I think I need a misting house.

    Randy, I have some others I bought from Jeff that trip that do awesome too. Stoplight is my favorite. I have General Paget, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mammy (a real winner for SoCal) and Charmer (very slow).

    Here is one of my favorite shots in the garden. You can see Mammy, Stop Light and Eleanor Roosevelt from right to left.
     

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  5. Native son

    Native son Well-Known Member

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    873
    Location:
    10a
    LJG really nice I love the variety. You have opened Pandora's box on croton naming I can't see Eleanor, but I do see a very interesting large green oakleaf in deep shade on the left. More pics with close up's of the CROKIES it is a game we like to play. This is a picture of Eleanor. image.jpg
     
  6. LJG

    LJG Active Member

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    425
    The ragbag mostly faded. I saw "Roosevelt" for sure. Are there other Roosevelt's that would match? Remember too my dry climate might play in a little.
     
  7. Native son

    Native son Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    873
    Location:
    10a
    I saw your name was Len, Lamar here. Franklin Roosevelt. The story goes F.R./E.R./Stoplight can from the same seed group. Most people question the truth of that story but anything goes with Croton seeds. Pic. Of F.R. image.jpg
     
  8. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,644
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    Try the 'bag method' for cuttings. Take cutting, dip in Rootone, insert in hole in potting soil, water well, insert in clear plastic bag, punch one or two vent holes in bag, seal bag and put in shady location (never in sunny location since contents will cook into croton mush), wait a month or so and you should have one or more rooted cuttings. I like the clear or frosty trash bags. The bag helps to maintain a very humid environment necessary for successful rooting.
     
  9. palmisland

    palmisland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,258
    Location:
    West Boca Raton 10b
    If I can add, Phil. I always put a few sticks in the pot to keep the bag from collapsing on it. Bags do work quite well.
     
  10. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,753
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Len,
    Good to hear that some are still doing very well. I'm sure they catch the eyes of many that come tour your yard for palms. A great splash of color and that tropical look.
     
  11. LJG

    LJG Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    Thanks Phil, so just to confirm what I am reading. Rooting hormone, place into a pot and that pot then gets a plastic bag hat? A makeshift hothouse? Size of cuttings matter?

    Yes Jeff. They certainly get asked about often.
     
  12. LJG

    LJG Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    Back to the naming as I would like to clear it up if I can. Here are two close ups of the plant. It did have a Roosevelt label. But of course that could have been wrong.
     

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  13. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Hi Len! So glad to see a SoCal poster on here. Please stick around and post more often.

    I love seeing your garden shot. Your home looks really cool with the stone and wood. That hardscape- especially around the pool looks great too.

    If I can give my 2 cents worth- I love using the bag method Phil mentioned, and the tall sticks Randy mentioned is great in keeping the plastic off the growing tips and surface of the leaves.

    Your crotons are looking great and the siting looks perfect with the high light and the stone and thick, low canopy to keep the area warm on cool nights. However, it looks like you need more crotons! Come back and visit when the sales/auctions are going on. Also, I'd love to see more of your garden/home. Looks like you love to garden.

    To me, the croton in #12 looks like either ADF#5 or possibly William Jennings Bryan. Check these out out in the wiki and see if either is a match.
     
  14. LJG

    LJG Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    Hi Anna. Thank you for your comments. I appreciate it :)
     
  15. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,644
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    I usually use cuttings about 9" long; strip or trim most of the leaves to reduce transpirations losses; root tone on lower 3" or so; into the pot (usually a 4" or larger but nothing larger than a small 1 gal pot) and into a clear plastic trash bag. Usually room for several in each bag. Objective is to maintain a high humidity environment in well-draining soil.)
     

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