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Cyphosperma balansae

Discussion in 'WIKI ARTICLE DISCUSSIONS' started by pogobob, Nov 23, 2008.

  1. pogobob

    pogobob Member

    Messages:
    10
    C. balansae

    Discussion thread for C. balansae. If you would like to add a comment, click the Post Reply button.
     
  2. Shon

    Shon Member

    Messages:
    23
    Re: C. balansae

    Do you have one Bob? If so I don't remember. And if not I think one would do very well in your garden.
     
  3. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,845
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    A user was asking,
    "Is this palm one that enjoys a very low pH (high acid)??"

    Excuse my ignorance, but are Florida soils generally high pH???

    I can tell you that soils here in Hawaii are generally acid, sometimes very acid, and the palm does great. I can also tell you that this palm does amazingly well in SoCal.

    So, I would assume that this may be another one of those palms that doesn't like excessive/persistent heat. Hawaii doesn't have much of an overall swing in temps, but the night time temps do get cooler than Florida in summer. And in SoCal they get very much cooler.

    So it may be like the same story with a D. decipiens. They like and even prefer some heat, just not constant heat, like a Florida summer.

    So, it may be a double whammy for this palm in Florida if it prefers cooler nights, and acid soil, if Florida soil is a higher pH which I suspect.
     
  4. TikiRick

    TikiRick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    455
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale, FL Zone 10b
    Our soils are mainly high ph or high alkaline. The only real acidic soils are those that have been enriched with, say oak leaves, over the years. I am not certain what the Everglades "muck" soil is. I would assume more acid as well due to the composting that takes place.
     

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