Crotons in habitat?

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by junglegal, Aug 24, 2010.

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  1. junglegal

    junglegal Esteemed Member

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    St. Pete FL
    It just occurred to me that I know nothing about where these plants grow naturally in the wild. What they look like left to nature's hand. Can someone school me and maybe post some pics? Has anyone gone on expeditions like they do for palms, broms etc? :confused:
     
  2. fawnridge

    fawnridge Well-Known Member

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    Western Boca Raton
    I've been in most of the older parks in Dade and Broward County (thank you, David McLean) and I don't think I've ever seen a Croton growing in the wild. Most of the expeditions are into the older neighborhoods of North Miami, Hollywood, Coconut Grove, etc. The best and often the rarest Crotons can be found growing in someone's backyard.
     
  3. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

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    Bren, Go to Wikipedia and search Codiaeum Variegatum. It may answer your questions.
     
  4. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Bren,

    In Dr. Frank Brown's book, Crotons of the World, he considereds the Molluca Islands of Indonesia to be the place where Codiaeum variegatum to originate from. He goes on to state, "Viti", the green form, occurs as undergrowth in the forest. The almost endless varieties of todays Codiaeum are probably all from this one botanical species.
     
  5. junglegal

    junglegal Esteemed Member

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    3,135
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    Thanks for the info! In exotica Graf also mentions a true croton in Vietnam called Poilanii
     
  6. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

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    This leads to the question that if there were two "Croton Worlds," say the Eastern and Western Hemisphere that evolved separately over a few hundred years, using the same wild croton stock, would the cultivars end up being the same.

    In other words, are there a limited number of croton "mutations" that would take place if given enough time regardless of where they were cultivated.
     
  7. koki

    koki Active Member

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    pine island, fl
    That is a very good question. Croton varieties are probably an excellent example of artificial selection. Your idea adds an element of natural selection. I wonder if anyone has looked into croton DNA and compared varieties. I would have no idea where to even start.

    Another croton mystery I have wondered about is using the root stock of a fast, hardy grower like 'Mortii' and grafting on a slow growing beauty like 'Mona Lisa' or 'Tiger Eye'.
     
  8. Crazy for Crotons

    Crazy for Crotons Well-Known Member

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    2,050
    Location:
    south Tampa, Bokeelia
    The Mollucan plants are probably quite tame compared to all the hybridized varieties in Florida. This is Florida's plant now in my humble opinion.
     
  9. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

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    2,754
    Location:
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    And has been for 75 years or more, I agree Ray.
     

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