1. NEW BROMELIAD FORUM
    Guest - Don't miss our new forum. Perhaps you have something to add or share with us.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Check out, join, and contribute to our Facebook Page. Help get more people to the Forum. NEW TROPISCAPE FACEBOOK GROUP
    Dismiss Notice

Croton Revolutions

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by Phil Stager, Dec 5, 2010.

Please Help Support Our Generous Sponsors

  1. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,585
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    as a follow up to an earlier thread on this new introduction, see:

    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/PP18957.html

    or to summarize it, Revolutions is a sport from Ram's Horn; first discovered in 1989; so at least 20 years from discovery to introduction to the trade - so much for getting rich quickly off crotons....
     
  2. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,816
    I picked up 2 more last weekend for 1.50 each in 4" pots plant is about 9" tall. I always have found them in 4" pots. Has anyone found these being sold in larger sizes?
     
  3. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    I haven't seen larger plants offered, but then this isn't exactly croton country around here...
    I planted two of those 4" pots in this 13" clay pot about six months ago, had them in full sun for several months or more which produce brilliant yellow new growth which started to burn after a few months, so I moved the pot to partial sun and the new growth greened up a lot almost to solid green...
    Anyway, I want to let them grow and see what they look like when they get large.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Crazy for Crotons

    Crazy for Crotons Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,050
    Location:
    south Tampa, Bokeelia
    That one has better color than most I've seen for sale.
     
  5. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    It was the typical dark green with hints of yellow when I bought it, but full sun brought out brilliant yellow new growth which after a few months started washing out and burning....
    Partial shade made almost all green growth, so next summer I want to find the right spot for it.
     
  6. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b

    Peyton - the right spot is in my yard! LOL :p
     
  7. Central Floridave

    Central Floridave Active Member

    Messages:
    483
    I always thought revolutions looked like ram's horn. (Not too hard to figure out why!).

    I have found revolutions the least cold tolerant croton out there. Rams horn isn't very cold tolerant for me either, nor does it grow very fast.

    Thanks for the link.
     
  8. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    I read the info. on the link and kind of got a good laugh, as they referred to this "invention". This is no invention. I'm no lawyer, but my take is this; the only patent is on the name and can not prevent someone else from rooting cuttings off of it. The argument could be that your Rams Horn in the yard threw the same sport, cultivar or what ever you want to call it. Which is possible. If some sort of legal action were to be taken against you, it probably would be best to have the Rams Horn growing in your own yard with the cultivar on it.

    Am I wrong here, what do you think?
     
  9. Phil Stager

    Phil Stager Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,585
    Location:
    Sunny St. Pete, FL
    Jeff -
    Dr. Brown could probably enlighten us a bit on patenting plants since he has more than a few but in Aglanomeas if I recall. Enforcing a patent is the difficult part, i.e., it costs money unless you have a Luca Brazzi on your payroll. A 'civilized' patent owner is not about to spend $5K on a $5 plant - bad return on investment.
    ..and even if the patent owner enforced the patent, I'm not sure he could recover anything but actual economic damages, profits made by the defendant, and in exceptionally rare cases, treble damages. A common defence in patent infringement cases is to attack the validity of the patent.
    Any patent lawyers reading this forum?
     
  10. Crotonologist

    Crotonologist Active Member

    Messages:
    761
    Location:
    southern Louisiana USDA 9a
    I think the main purpose of a plant patent is to collect royalties from large growers who mass produce the plant.
    Small operators are not worth the trouble as Phil has pointed out.
    So unless the plant is a large scale success, the patent is probably not worth much...
     
  11. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Peyton,

    I'm pretty sure that the patent covers the name only, and like you stated, for large growers that want to produce this plant would use the name Revolutions.

    But to prove in a court of law that this sport would never, ever occure again would be simply shot down. I seriously think if another grower started growing some under a different name, so be it. Would this be acceptable in the nursery trade by confussing everyone, absolutely not, but it does happen.

    It was featured in a booth 2 years ago at the big foliage trade show in Ft. Lauderdale, TPIE, and I'm pretty sure it was absent just last year. This croton isn't going to set any records for sales anytime soon, or become the "next" big thing.:)
     

Share This Page