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Cold weather

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by zone11dreamer, May 21, 2010.

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  1. zone11dreamer

    zone11dreamer Active Member

    Messages:
    49
    Hi all,

    I must say my decision for put hay around ( most) of my crotons worked out for me. The ones that I didn't hay ... pie crust, coppenger (sp), Mrs. Iceton, and a small handful of others I don't know the name of are either dead or have an 2-3 inch little sticks with a few leaves emerging from the bottom.

    I heavily hayed Stoplight, Magnificent, Pinocchio , Freckles, And they didn't suffer much at all. The only exception was Mona Lisa. Even with hay it suffered horribly. I felt they were slow growers and that I had to do something to protect them. I kept it on them for about 8 weeks. And the plants were all small. No bigger than 3 -4 foot.

    I am in zone 10A but it felt like Jacksonville. I don't come close to have the varieties that you all do. But I now feel that I will take a chance with some of the other crotons that I have been eye balling :)
     
  2. Jeff Searle

    Jeff Searle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Location:
    South Florida, USA
    Thanks for some positive feedback. Glad to hear it all worked out.

    After the cold months, do you just spread the hay as mulch around, or do you gather it back up?


    Jeff
     
  3. zone11dreamer

    zone11dreamer Active Member

    Messages:
    49
    I spread some of it around and some goes in the compost pile. It really isn't nice to look at so most HOA s will freek out if you do your front yard.
     
  4. Crazy for Crotons

    Crazy for Crotons Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,050
    Location:
    south Tampa, Bokeelia
    I use pine needles instead of mulch these days. It makes the ground look like native pineland, has OK insulating properties and more importantly, suppresses most weeds.
     

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