Cold hardiness of crotons

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by annafl, Feb 16, 2014.

Banner funded expressly in recognition and support of Tropiscape.

  1. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Hey, this might be a good time for all of us to post which crotons made it through this all-be-it pretty mild winter with flying colors and which wimped out and dropped quite a few leaves.

    For me, the lowest temp in my yard this winter was 37. I also had a 38 or two and maybe a dozen mornings in the low 40's. No freezes, frosts. Not a lot of consecutive cold days. It was a pretty mild winter overall. I think milder than average, but not as mild as last winter.

    Here are my lists:

    From wimpiest to moderately wimpy:

    Wimpiest:

    Robert Halgrim and Ram's Horn were tied for the wimpiest by far of all. Significant leaf drop to affect the overall look of the plant.
    Monarch (annoyingly wimpy as it regularly lost old, huge leaves that had a lot of life left in them)
    Applause-my plant is small, and got smaller as about 33% leaves fell off.

    More wimpy than average, but not so much to affect the plant look a lot:

    Doris
    Rudy Bachman
    Commotion
    Yellow Iceton
    I'll put interruptum here, but really not as affected as the above. Perhaps more leaves dropped, but the leaves are thin, so the overall look wasn't affected.


    Tough as nails:

    Thea-delicate look, but didn't drop a leaf. Was newly planted last fall. I wish I would've taken Ricky up on his offer of a cutting a while back so I could try it in a different spot. Love this beautiful plant!
    Quirko
    Rubens
    Stewartii
    Mackenzie
    Magnificent
    Wilma
    Red Quill
    Irresistible
    Cutler's Gulfstream
    White Ann Rutherford
    Davis 1
    Mrs. Iceton
    William Craig
    General Marshall
    Mona Lisa

    The rest did fine, losing a couple or a few leaves here and there, not affecting the overall look of the plant.

    Hey, please post your experience. Scott, I started this thread so as not to hijack yours, and to have key words in the title if anyone wants to look up this topic on search. I see that Duke of Windsor and Irresistible are on your list of ones that were cold-hardy winners? Any others that do well in your yard? You and Ray seem to be in the coldest areas of those that post here. Maybe Central Floridave, but I haven't seen him posting in a while. Seems like David King gets down in temp pretty far. All of you guys, what is your experience? It would be helpful to many-namely me. Phil, do you think you're a bit warmer than me? What else is a wimp in your yard besides interruptum?
     
  2. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Coldest morning for me was a refreshing (no frost :D) 34F with another 7 mornings in the upper 30's. My wimpiest Dreadlocks and Zanzibar These 2 are sticks at this time showing signs of new growth.
    Semi wimp- Robert Lavalois planted in a very protected location showing 50% leaf drop at this time. ​
    All other Crotons show no ill from the cold temps at this time.
    IMG_4032.jpg
     
  3. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Anna, I have had Rams Horn for some years now and I have not (knocking on wood) had a problem with it in the cold. I cut the top out of it last weekend for bushy growth.
    IMG_4003.jpg
     
  4. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Anna, I am glad to see Magnificent on your list. I have 3 plantings for a few years now and happy to report all is fine. I had been told it was a very wimpy Croton when it came to cold but we prove otherwise.
    The new growth still looks great.​
    IMG_4000.jpg IMG_4004.jpg
     
  5. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Interesting, Scott, your babies look great. My dreadlocks I bring into the garage if it is going to be below 48 or so. I gave up on Zanzibar last year after I saw how wimpy it was with cold and with pests. My ram's horn is in a pot, so maybe that's why it's been so sensitive. Even in the mid to high 40's it has dropped leaves, so I bring it in the garage for anything below 48 or so. With your experience, I think I will plant it in the ground this spring in a protected area and see if it doesn't do fine. Thanks. This thread has already helped me. I hope others take the time to post their experiences.:rolleyes:
     
  6. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Anna, Here are a few more (photos from today) that did great in the chill with no leaf drop. I know you like to test your ID skills so no names posted. :)
    IMG_4002.jpg IMG_4010.jpg IMG_4011.jpg IMG_4017.jpg IMG_4018.jpg IMG_4031.jpg
     
  7. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
  8. Kingdavid

    Kingdavid Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    1,147
    Location:
    st lucie co
    Some dont like the freezes at all .Some did good a lot just got fresh shoots burned . Thank goodness it was only for an hour or so Now the Piasso was the worst Bogorienses did not so good Eleanor Rosevelt about the bsame , the superstar wasnt to happy either . Some really nice Rudy B polinated with Gloriosa seedlings bit the dust , ill have to try that one again !!!! Gotta respect MOTHER NATURE
     

    Attached Files:

    • 125.jpg
      125.jpg
      File size:
      257.5 KB
      Views:
      12
    • 003.jpg
      003.jpg
      File size:
      208.8 KB
      Views:
      14
    • 034.jpg
      034.jpg
      File size:
      228.3 KB
      Views:
      11
    • 035.jpg
      035.jpg
      File size:
      162.1 KB
      Views:
      14
    • 018.jpg
      018.jpg
      File size:
      123.3 KB
      Views:
      16
  9. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    David, wow, that Bogoriensis and Eleanor Roosevelt look pretty cooked! Will they come back ok? That's very interesting, because I have a number of Eleanor Roosevelt in the ground and even during harsher winters they have done well. My lows have been 27-28 in this yard. Of course, only for a few hours at a time, and only a couple of times. Scott also says his Ram's Horn is not very sensitive to cold, and mine is. I wonder if there's more to it than variety. Who knows, maybe soil type? My Ram's Horn and your Eleanor are in pots too.
     
  10. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    By the way, in post 1, under tough as nails, I meant Van Ruben, not Rubens. I don't have a Rubens.

    Scott, I do like to try to id crotons for my benefit to see if I'm getting better, but I don't necessarily like to do it in front of the internet world so they can see how bad I am. I am not too proud, though, so here goes. It's a good way to get id's from people who won't do it otherwise.

    Yellow Iceton
    King of Siam
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    FDR or Golden Glow in shade
    Irene Kingsley/Satan
    ?Captain Gilbert Cutler (no scale)

    Caribbean Star
    Madam Fernand Kohl (no scale)
    President Reagan
    Diane
    ?
    ADF 5
    Multicolor

    How'd did I do? Now I'll have to find at least a dozen for you to try your id skills on. Give me a couple of days and I'll post them for you.

    By the way, my guesses for the top photo are:

    Lillian Stoffregen (beautiful)
    Batik
    King of Siam
    And a red beauty which I can't think of- what is this pretty thing?
     
  11. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Ana, You did great! FDR it is, Madam Fernand Kohl is Gloriosum Supperbum and the ? is Sturrock's Pink Veitchi. As for the first group shot Batik is Red Bannana and the "pretty thing" is unknown.
     
  12. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Oh, that's good news, Scott. Thanks. I'll have yours when I can get out and take photos morning or evening. Beautiful day here today. Wish I could spend more time outside. Phooey.:mad:
     
  13. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Here is wimpy Zanzibar back in the summer and now...
    IMG_2295.jpg IMG_4070.jpg
     
  14. Kingdavid

    Kingdavid Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    1,147
    Location:
    st lucie co
    My small Zanzibar do the same thing when they are young , only when they get older and established do they seem to hold up in the cold better . My bigger ones are now 5 and 6 years old and did great . Have no clue why others did horrible , that have done fine in past years .
     
  15. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    My Zanzibar looks like your after photo also. I have it tucked in close to my compost pile where no one can see it, but it gets sprinkled just in case it can muster up some life, but I no longer expect anything out of it. I had another senior moment when I said Van Ruben was tough as nails. I meant Van Buren:eek:. You all were so kind not to correct me. I don't mind being corrected, though.

    Scott, sorry for the delay, here are some to test/have fun with your id skills:
     

    Attached Files:

  16. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    A few more:


    DSC_0518.jpg DSC_0522.jpg DSC_0525.jpg DSC_0493.jpg DSC_0496.jpg DSC_0498.jpg DSC_0514.jpg DSC_0508.jpg
     
  17. palmisland

    palmisland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,258
    Location:
    West Boca Raton 10b
    Ana, Your plants really look like they enjoyed the cooler weather:D The colors are magnificent. I'll take a stab at the ID's a little later.
     
  18. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Thanks, Randy. Most did real well this winter. The couple of wimps are starting to get growth already. Most of my plants are still small, but I'm hoping for a really good year of growth and color. The ones that have been in the ground a year, or especially two, are starting to show they are very ready for spring, with new growth showing in several areas. I can't wait.
     
  19. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    OK Anna, here are my guesses. Some I am certain of, others not so sure.
    First Set:
    Fishbone & Petra
    Victoria Gold Bells
    Cornbread
    Van Buren
    William Craig? or Daisy Ortegas?
    Davis #1
    Playboy
    Compte de Germiny
    ? whatever it is, it is really nice looking

    Second Set:
    Joe Friday
    Cordyline
    Wilma
    Plaid Oak
    Corot
    Polychrome
    Stoplight
    Congo
    Your crotons look wonderful, particularly for the temperatures you experienced. Thank you for sharing.
     
  20. Dypsisdean

    Dypsisdean Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,862
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii - Kona
    I think this is a excellent effort. To be able to expand the Croton outside of the tropics would help awareness a lot. They are not used hardly at all in the SoCal garden. But if a list of the cultivars that might be able to make it there could open up a huge group of new interested growers. When people constantly try and fail, then nobody even tries anymore. But I have a feeling they are just using the wrong cultivars - the ones that come it to the Big Box Stores. With palms, pushing that envelope outside of the sub-tropical zone has really expanded the number of enthusiasts. When people start seeing a variety successfully grown in a garden, the interest grows.

    I am intending to start up the TropiScape Blog with periodic articles on the Front Page. And an article on the 10 hardiest Crotons would probably do well with the search engines and interested readers. We could link to it from other sites and all the networking would only increase viewers and possible participation.
     
  21. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Ding ding ding ding ding ding!!!! We have a winner! Wow, Tim, 100%. I know I don't have anything ultra rare, but still, no mistakes from photos is amazing! The one you didn't know is that unknown favorite of mine that I keep showing, thinking one of these days someone might have a name for it. The cordyline was for Scott, because I like that little thing and he knows so much about cordylines I hoped he might give me the name for it. Great job!:cool:
     
  22. palmisland

    palmisland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,258
    Location:
    West Boca Raton 10b
     
  23. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    You know, Randy, I think last time you might have also said it looks like Royal Flush. It does to me also, but Ray had said no, definitely not, and Jeff commented on something, but doesn't like to try to id by photos. No one else commented, so I keep trying. I do think it must be Royal Flush, but can't get more people to chime in yea or nay. This is a plant I bought from Mark Peters as a Gloriosa, which it is definitely not. It was pretty blacked out at the time, but the ugly duckling is beautiful now, and gets even better with every flush. I've never seen a mature Royal Flush in person. Only photos. The one you gave me is giving a flush now, but still not mature enough to compare. Thanks for chiming in. Maybe someone else will confirm our suspicions.:D
     
  24. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Hey, Randy, and any others, what are your feelings about cold hardy crotons in your garden vs. wimpier ones? I know this winter may not have tried them too much in your garden, but in the past?
     
  25. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Very nice looking plants Anna. I checked my ID skills and had less than 1/2 right. :eek:
    The Cordyline looks likes Miniature Maui-Silver or Maroon Minature.​
    :cool:
     
  26. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    Wow! I'm even impressed at my skills. I guess thats what can happen when I am learning from the best. Thanks to all who have helped me on the way to being a complete croton freak.
     
  27. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Yes, you are super good, or should we call you super freak?;) Joking, of course. You will be the next Bob Alonso. Have you seen a Royal Flush, Tim? My plant unknown doesn't look familiar to you?

    Dean, I didn't mean to not address what you said. I wish we could make a list, it's just that not many of us that participate are in cooler areas, and not all of those weigh in regularly. I'd love to have that list too, so I don't waste my time with plants that aren't going to do well for me.
     
  28. kwtimo

    kwtimo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    key west, fl 10b-11
    Anna, I'm pretty sure Jeff has a nice sized Royal Flush, I can't remember if Judy, Jerry or Ron have mature plants or not. Maybe Randy too. Perhaps we should start a Royal Flush thread, imploring the help of the seasoned croton heads? My plant recently installed at Audubon House is at least a growing season away from giving any indicator of its real potential. CAM00230.jpg
     
  29. Native son

    Native son Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    873
    Location:
    10a
    :cool:
    Hey guys this is my six month old from Jeff's last sale
     

    Attached Files:

  30. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    So sorry, Scott, I didn't see your comment till now. Don't know how I missed it. I will put a tag on my ti with both names! Thanks!

    Thanks for the photos, Tim and Lamar. Lamar, yours looks more pastel-like, but maybe gets more shade? Mine gets quite a bit of sun and the pinks are more like watermelon. No reds, mostly watermelon pink and pinky-orange also. Leaf shape is perfect, though, and habit is more like the ones in the wiki. Tim, I think I will start a thread. Good idea. Maybe there will be more responses.
     
  31. Crazy for Crotons

    Crazy for Crotons Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,050
    Location:
    south Tampa, Bokeelia
    Ana, my lowest temp here was 35F on the night FSU proudly won the BCS football national championship (Jan 7). The entire month of January was on the cool side however. This I find can cause defoliation as much as one cold night buried in an entire month of warm weather.
     
  32. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Sounds like we're pretty close weather-wise, Ray. I imagine Phil is a bit warmer and maybe Scott a tiny bit colder? Where does Perry live? Also, didn't Toby move up toward Tampa? There are a few of us croton lovers up this way. I know David lives on the other side of the state in St. Lucie Co. and seems to get a bit colder than here? Maybe a little more inland.
     
  33. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Mango is a great Croton for the colder areas, the colder temps did not faze these and pushed new growth all season. These two are growing on the south side of heavy palm plantings. These Mangos replaced my Pie Crust's lost to the cold a few years ago. I topped these a few weeks ago to make them branch more. With what most of the USA mainland experienced this Winter I feel real real (did I say real?) lucky.
    IMG_4242.jpg IMG_4229.jpg
     
  34. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    This unknown also handles the cold well.
    IMG_4228.jpg
     
  35. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    So Scott, what was your lowest low this year? Do you know? Also, the color on those mangos is amazing. Can you show some closeups for a wiki shot?;)
     
  36. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Anna, Here are the Jan 2014 recordings from my personal weather station. The lowest reading was 34.1f. on Jan. 7.
    FotoFlexer_Photojan14.jpg
     
  37. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Anna, The Mango's up close. I have 4 of them in the garden. The 2 with the best color are the 2 (in these photos) that came from Cleo. The box store 2 are not very colorful. These photos taken this afternoon showing the topping of new growth a few weeks ago.
    IMG_4246.jpg IMG_4248.jpg IMG_4250.jpg IMG_4251.jpg IMG_4252.jpg
     
  38. annafl

    annafl Esteemed Member

    Gorgeous, Scott. When I saw your plant, I thought General Marshall. I've never seen Mango in person. Does anyone think this resembles General Marshall?:confused:
     

Share This Page