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An unsightly part of the garden ...

Discussion in 'THE CROTON SOCIETY' started by Moose, Jun 12, 2011.

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  1. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Its a bit embarrassing, here is an unsightly and neglected area of my garden. :eek:

    This is under an 60 year old avocado tree. I plan on cleaning up the area and create my newest croton bed. It will be next to impossible to dig due to the mass of roots. Mound planting will have to be the technique to accomplish this endeavor. Lots of compost and mulch will be needed. :)

    This is the morning sun that this area gets, remains in shade for the rest of the day. My vision is to mix crotons, understory cycads and palms here. Will update with pictures as the process unfolds. ;)
     

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  2. junglegal

    junglegal Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    3,133
    Location:
    St. Pete FL
    My whole yard is unsightly at the moment. You're a brave man LOL. Bet it will look fantastic. One question though. I've always read that it's really bad to mound, mulch too heavily around trees. Their roots suffocate. Is this a fallacy?
     
  3. koki

    koki Active Member

    Messages:
    266
    Location:
    pine island, fl
    Moose what is the epiphyte next to the staghorn fern?
     
  4. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Toby - It is a large specimen Vanda sp. orchid. Two bloom spikes just got wasted by thrips. It was rescued as a youngerster from a tree that died and was to be cut down about 17 years ago. It has grown quite a bit since then. On the backside of the staghorn is a large Oncidium sp. that just finished with 4 massive bloom spikes that had easily 1,000 small blooms collectively.

    My original plan was to have colorful orchids all over the garden. The only ones that remain are those that have acclimated and survive on their own. Too much hassle for way too little of color. Crotons fill the niche for color in the garden now. :cool:
     
  5. Crazy for Crotons

    Crazy for Crotons Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,050
    Location:
    south Tampa, Bokeelia
    Ron, you've just confirmed my belief that orchids are not easy to grow. I work with a few people that say orchids "thrive on neglect" and only need a "little misting" here and here. There's more to keeping those things alive than most orchid fanatics will admit.
     
  6. ScotTi

    ScotTi Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    4,816
    Ray, I agree that they "thrive on neglect". Do not baby them and you will be rewarded.
     

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  7. Moose

    Moose Esteemed Member

    Messages:
    7,947
    Location:
    Coral Gables, FL Zone 10b
    Sadly a year and a half later this section looks even worse. :(

    Fortunately other areas have been improved. Overall - I got crap laying around every where. Hmmmm - one day at a time ... :p
     

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